Closing the Case: A Few Solutions to the Alcohol Abuse Problem at UMD. Blog Article #10

INTRODUCTION

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

Alcohol abuse will most likely always be a problem at the University of Maryland, or any college for that matter. It is just simply part of the culture. Nonetheless, the problem can be diminished just like the teen smoking epidemic  was in the 1990’s. Very few young people smoke now compared to the number that did 10 or 20 years ago. If the right actions are taken, and the solutions I’ll discuss in this post are a good start, then the problem of alcohol abuse can definitely be resolved. The solutions I discuss involve the police department here at UMD because of the way I framed the problem.

SOLUTION 1

One problem that I believe is making the binge-drinking problem at UMD worse than it needs to be is policy confusion and student-police relations. Some young people drink because its an adventurous experience since its against the law. The problem stems from the fact that many students take this to the extreme. One solution to the problem is to stop sending mixed signals to college students. Can I drink? Do the police care? Am I going to get arrested? Go to jail? What is and isn’t okay? That’s a lot of questions. In an effort to reduce extreme drinking on campus, the University of Central Michigan police department visited students in their homes to talk honestly about drinking. They answered those questions for students. This dispelled myths about drinking for the students. Students, especially underage ones, were informed on what they could and could not do when it came to drinking. During the student interviews that I conducted, both interviewees, who are students here at UMD, agreed that this solution could work at this university.

SOLUTION 2

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

One other potential solution to the problem, that you as students may be opposed to, is to decrease the accessibility of alcohol and decrease alcohol advertising. To use the analogy of smoking again, the use of cigarettes, especially among teens, decreased significantly after the tobacco advertising ban in the late ’90s. Decreasing advertising of alcohol around college campuses may help resolve the issue. Even though Keystone tastes like sadness, its hard to beat 150 beers for $70.

 

REFLECTION

Throughout the semester, I have been searching for problems resulting from extreme drinking, problems contributing to it, and potential solutions to help alleviate the problem. As the semester progressed, I made changes to what problem I was trying to solve and also altered my proposed strategy several times. I had to make changes as I realized that some of my earlier proposed solutions had already been implemented at UMD. Though what I have presented here barely scratches the surface as far as potential solutions go, it’s a move in the right direction.

 

*Source for featured image on cover

Alcohol Abuse: UMD Student Interviews. Blog Article #9

INTRODUCTION

For this blog post, I interviewed two University of Maryland sophomores about alcohol abuse on campus. After identifying and defining the problem, we talked about medical amnesty and student-police relations. One of my interviewees is in a fraternity while the other one is a mechanical engineering student at the Clark School of Engineering. In the following discussion, in order to protect their identity, I will refer to these two students as Student 1 and Student 2 respectively.

THE PROBLEM

I began the interview by sharing what I have already learned about alcohol abuse at UMD based on my survey results. Both interviewees agreed that alcohol abuse is a problem at UMD and that something surely needs to be done about it. I then asked my peers how they defined alcohol abuse and got some really good answers. Student 1 defined it as “someone who continually needs assistance when they go out drinking.” Student 2 defined alcohol abuse as students who “don’t know their limits.” These great definitions, which helped further define the problem, provided a good basis to move forward with more specific questions. Though Student 1 then traced the problem back to alcohol experiences from high school, looking there for solutions is out of the scope of my research.

Medical

Source: Click Here

MEDICAL AMNESTY

I asked both Students, 1 and 2, if they knew what medical amnesty was. Neither of them could give me a straight answer. Once I explained the law to them, they told me that they were familiar with it; however, they did not know it by its official name nor did they know all of the ins and outs of how the policy works. Student 1 mentioned that there was even a recent incident that occurred where he could have utilized the law to his benefit but didn’t because he didn’t know enough about it.

STUDENT-POLICE RELATIONS

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

Next, I talked with my peers about the UMD police force. Student 1 argued that the police department isn’t too concerned about underage drinking. Student 2 mentioned that it seems like they only try to enforce and prevent reckless drinking. When I asked about the drinking policy confusion, one of the things I discussed in blog 7, Student 1 said that it is definitely controversial and sends mixed signals about what students can and can’t do. Nonetheless, he mentioned that the UMD alcohol policies have to remain as they are and the police are the ones responsible for what they choose to enforce. Based on the interview, I concluded that student-police relations at UMD are okay, but there is some room for improvement.

DISCUSSION

To close the interview, I shared with both students two of my proposed solutions for reducing alcohol abuse at UMD. Both students agreed that raising awareness about medical amnesty would at least help alleviate the consequences of severe alcohol abuse as students would be less hesitant to call for medical help when needed. Moreover, I explained another solution to my interviewees that involves police talking with freshman to let them know what to expect with the enforcement of drinking policies on campus. In my next, and final, blog post, I’ll go into much more detail about my proposed solutions for reducing alcohol abuse at UMD.

*Source for featured image on cover

Alcohol Abuse: UMD Student Survey Results. Blog Article #8

INTRODUCTION

Since last weeks post, I created and administered a brief survey about alcohol abuse for my fellow University of Maryland students to take. No one likes taking surveys. People, especially students with crazy schedules, usually don’t have the time to take a survey. To combat this problem, I made my survey very straightforward and simple. It consisted of only four yes or no questions. Because of its simplicity, I achieved a response rate of about 30%. This response rate is about 5% higher than what the average normally is for an email survey. In total, over 150 students completed the survey. This blog post will discuss the survey results and how they will help me finish up my research on the subject of alcohol abuse at UMD.

SURVEY: WHAT DID STUDENTS SAY?

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

Here’s a link to the survey I sent out to several UMD students. Feel free to take it if you have 30 seconds to spare. Actually, I bet you could do it in 15. Anyway, based on the survey, 63% of students agree that alcohol abuse is a problem on campus at UMD. Of those who agreed, 75% of them said that something needs to be done to resolve the problem. More specifically, they said “yes” to “do you think something needs to be done to help reduce the amount of alcohol abuse on campus?” Most of the students who didn’t think alcohol abuse was a problem clearly didn’t think the problem needs resolving. About 83% of students agreed that alcohol abuse decreases a student’s quality of life. Therefore, most students can agree that this is an important issue. It is extremely important to enjoy life to both the fullest extent and the highest quality possible – especially while you are young. Of course, as a college student, at least some drinking is normal and acceptable. It needs to done responsibly though so it does not cause more harm than good. The final survey question was phrased casually. It said “do you know someone who frequently ‘overdoes it’ when they drink?” This question was posed so I could get a sense of just how many students are acquainted with someone who may be having problems with alcohol abuse. About 60% of students said yes to this question. Note that the question used the word “frequently.” A lot of students have gone past their limits once. Alcohol abuse is when students do that several re-occurring times.

SUMMARY

Based on the student survey I sent out, alcohol abuse is most certainly a problem at the University of Maryland. Many students on campus recognize the problem exists and that something needs to be done about it. A lot of students know someone who may be dealing with alcohol abuse. The problem is widespread. Based on my findings, I will form some interview questions to get more in-depth feedback from a UMD student about the issue. This will be addressed in next week’s blog post.

Big thanks to everyone who took my survey! Feel free to hit me up with any comments or questions that you have.

*Source for featured image on cover

What Has UMD Done to Decrease Alcohol Abuse Among Students? Blog Article #7

INTRODUCTION

As pointed out in my first blog post, college students have a track record of overdoing it with alcohol. Things are no different at the University of Maryland. Fortunately, campus authorities have already taken several steps to alleviate the problem. In this post, I’m going to tell you about some of the solutions that have been implemented to help prevent and resolve alcohol abuse on campus.

ALCOHOL EDUCATION

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

If you started at UMD as a freshman, you may remember this alcohol education program. called AlcoholEdu, that you had to complete during your first semester at the university. As a transfer student, I didn’t know about this until stumbling upon it as part of my research. Upon looking into the program, I expected it to be cheesy and preachy. Surprisingly, it is just the opposite. The online program tailors itself to each individual student based on things like drinking behaviors and level of awareness. The way the course is laid out changes based on how risky of a drinker you are. The learning interface is really good and not overly dull. The program is split into two parts so that you get reminded about what you learned as events like Homecoming and Halloween parties roll around. Overall, this program has both increased students knowledge and awareness about alcohol while also acting as a way to gather data to initiate and substantiate further research. Clearly though, educating incoming freshman about drinking has not fully resolved the alcohol abuse problem on campus.

HELP FOR TROUBLED STUDENTS

The University Health Center has this page, and others like it, available for students dealing with substance abuse. This source helps you determine if you, or someone you know, has problems with alcohol and what steps you can take to remediate the problem. Further links within this website make it easy to find out more if you need to. This was easy enough to find via a google search so it is definitely accessible to students. The University Health Center also has program called UMD weekends. You can sign up to get weekly emails about alcohol-free weekend events at UMD.

Breaking the Law

Source: Click Here

FAILING POLICY

Though I understand that its a bit of a legal formality, this UMD web page about the campus Drug and Alcohol Abuse Policy is almost humorous. To quote one of the policies listed, “this policy prohibits the possession or use of alcohol by any student under the age of 21 or furnishing of alcohol to a person known to be under the age of 21.” I honestly laughed a little inside when I saw that. As a student at UMD, I know that this policy, among many others like it, is violated on a daily basis. Enforcing strict laws like this is difficult though. Therefore, either the policy itself or the implementation of it needs changing.

DISCUSSION

Educating students about drinking is only one solution to decreasing alcohol abuse at UMD. There is more that can be done. Fortunately for now, help is available for students who know, or at least think, that they have a problem. Though brute law enforcement certainly isn’t the answer, the policy on alcohol use at UMD is almost pointless as it is violated nearly 24/7 by students all over campus. What do you think? Would creating a new, better-enforceable policy be a solution to the problem?

*Source for featured image on cover

Underage Drinking: Is 21 the Right Age? Blog Article #6

INTRODUCTION

While doing research for this blog post, I came across a great video from the CBS news show 60 Minutes.This video is a debate on lowering the drinking age in the U.S. Both sides of the argument are presented well in the video. For example, if the drinking age were lowered, underage college students would probably be quicker to call for medical help when things get out of hand; however, it will likely do very little to make college students more knowledgeable and more responsible about alcohol abuse.

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

U.S. DRINKING AGE

The U.S. drinking age was originally raised in 1984 after the National Minimum Drinking Age Act was signed by President Ronald Reagan. Only eleven other countries have a minimum drinking age as high as the U.S. More than 80% of the world’s countries have a drinking age lower than 21. After prohibition in the rolling twenties, alcohol was re-legalized in the U.S. Then, in the late ’60s and early ’70s, the legal drinking age was lowered to 18 in most states. This quickly resulted in an increase in drunk-driving and alcohol-related motor accidents. Reagan’s law resolved this problem to some extent as it decreased drunk driving accidents by about 50%. Countless debates, such as the one I linked to in the introduction, have persisted ever since. If you’re underage now, hopefully your luck won’t be as bad as Bad Luck Brian’s.

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

OTHER COUNTRIES

In many European countries (source), where the minimum drinking age is 18, a greater percentage of young people drink more frequently; however, the number of dangerous intoxication incidences that occur is much lower. In these countries with lower drinking ages, only about 10% of drinking occasions result in the person getting drunk. Conversely, in the U.S, when young people drink, about half of drinking incidences end in intoxication. Why does this happen? In low drinking age countries, parents are responsible for regulating the amount of alcohol their children consume. This helps young people get an idea of what alcohol does to them and how much they can handle before they go out to drink on their own. Young Americans do not get this opportunity because it is considered unethical (it’s slightly illegal…) to get alcohol for underage people.

DISCUSSION

I am not necessarily advocating for the drinking age to be reduced in this country; however, there are a lot of good arguments fighting for the case. If 18-year-olds can be in the military, vote, serve on jury duty, get married, and buy guns, why, then, are they not fit to purchase, or at least consume, alcohol? It has been argued, as I discussed in my my second blog post, that before the age of 21, your brain is still developing and alcohol can adversely affect it more so than it would an adult. Additionally, just like what happened in the ’60s when the drinking age was lowered, drunk driving incidents could increase significantly if 18-year-olds were once again legally allowed to drink. The argument can easily go both ways. I will end with this though. According to the Diamondback, the student newspaper at UMD, the UMD police department, and other college officials, are more concerned about irresponsible drinking, such as binge-drinking, than underage drinking.

What do you guys think the drinking age should be in the U.S.? Should it be lowered or stay the same?

*Source for featured image on cover

Why Do You Drink? Blog Article #5

INTRODUCTION

Many students are fascinated and empowered by drinking. For some, it acts as a status symbol. Why is alcohol so appealing? And why is drinking the go-to activity for so many students? Based on my research for this blog post, I found out that there are four main reasons that college students drink.

SOCIAL

When first starting your college career, you are in a completely new environment and typically find yourself having to make all new friends. Between trying to fit in with your peers and meet high academic expectations, students are often overwhelmed with their new life. Introverted, shy students may especially have difficulty putting themselves out there. This is where alcohol comes in. According to a 2013 study, there is a positive relationship between social drinking motives and drinking behaviors. Though the study only showed a correlation between socialization and drinking, a lot of students do rely on parties to meet new people. You have probably experienced this yourself. Drinking can be difficult to avoid because alcohol is the centerpiece of most college parties.

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

COST

Why, then, is alcohol the go-to activity at most college parties? The answer is simple. It’s cheap. The table on the right provides a good cost comparison between alcohol-related activities and non-drinking activities. Why would you go to an expensive concert when you could just go to a party with high-energy music at practically no cost? If house parties aren’t your thing, most bars surrounding college campuses offer ridiculously cheap deals on drinks, such as happy-hour specials, nearly every night of the week (source). This has done nothing but exacerbate the binge-drinking issue on college campuses, especially here at UMD.

COPING 

Some students drink to cope with emotional problems. Dependence on alcohol can quickly lead to alcohol abuse. If drinking is significantly altering your lifestyle, then it is a problem. Drinking due to emotional instability is one of the most influential factors of heavy episodic drinking. Temporarily enhancing your mood, students coping with severe emotional, physical, or mental stress are susceptible to drinking too much.

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

PEER PRESSURE

Many students attend parties without the intention of getting wasted because they have other responsibilities or commitments the next day. As a student at a party, it can be difficult to refuse drinks from your peers. Drunk people sincerely want you to get in on what they have because they want you to have a good time too. That’s why you will frequently be offered so many drinks when you go to a party. The party hosts don’t have an agenda to get you wasted and hungover. An interview with several college students revealed that if you refuse a few times though, people will respect your decision and stop pressuring you.

CONCLUSION

There are several reasons, both good and bad, that you may choose to get involved with drinking in college. Socializing is beneficial for human development but using alcohol as a treatment for emotional problems can quickly lead to serious addiction issues. Don’t let drinking be your automatic “let’s have a good time” activity. In doing this, it can become a habit and lead to a lifestyle dependent on alcohol. What do you think? Why do you drink?

*Source for featured image on cover

Alcohol and Academics. Blog Article #3

Alcohol alone won’t necessarily be a major detriment to your grades in college. Making it a part of your lifestyle will though. For this blog post, I chose to reference peer reviewed academic journals and reflect on the information they provide. Don’t be overwhelmed or scared off by this. I just wanted to make sure my data was accurate.

First Year College Students

A 2015 study by Gary Liguori and Barb Lonbaken provides an analysis of drinking behaviors, and their corresponding consequences, of first year college students. During the semester in which the study was conducted, 53% of the students, both male and female, reported at least one case of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Even though freshman reported the lowest mean HED cases and total number of drinks, the impact experienced by them is still clear. Compared to their non-drinking peers, first-year male college students were more than two times more likely to not be enrolled their second year. Drinking in college, and the activities associated with it, definitely have an impact on student’s grades.

Source: Click Here

Source: Click Here

Drinking and Academic Performance

Another study, done in 2009, provides some insight into some academic problems associated with college drinking. The authors explain why their is such little scientific data on this subject though. The majority of undergraduate college students are under 21 and it is therefore both illegal and unethical to have them participate in studies. Research with adults has shown decreased memory retention, intellectual performance, and learning capabilities while under the influence. These affects do not last long after alcohol is flushed out of your body. Even though there are research barriers, useful data on college drinking has been obtained using surveys. An inverse relationship exists between excessive drinking and self-reported grade point average. The more you drink, the more your grades will plummet. Nonetheless, other studies mentioned in the article, such as one done at the University of California, Berkeley, concluded that drinking has little to no affect on college GPA. The picture above reflects this to some extent. You can still excel in college even if you drink occasionally. It is only when you exceed a certain threshold that your academic performance is at risk.

It Isn’t Just the Alcohol

From both of the academic papers I read for this post, I learned that the problem stems more from the environment most students are in when they get drunk rather than the alcohol itself. Late nights out partying coupled with early mornings for class leave students with no time to sleep. The combination of feeling sick from a hangover and just being groggy from lack of sleep is what often causes students to miss class and perform poorly on exams. As I pointed out in my first blog post, it all boils down to drinking responsibly. Whether or not underage students should have such easy, unrestricted access to alcohol is a whole other issue. If your grades are suffering, especially if you’re in your first year, you need to do more than just reevaluate the amount of alcohol you consume. You need to make a major change in your lifestyle. Yes, drinking is hurting your grades; however, this only rings true if the term “drinking” encompasses activities such as staying up late and losing sleep. The link between academic inadequacy and excessive drinking is dependent on more than just the alcohol itself.

*Source  for Featured Image on Cover